Travel Advisor Group Supports Resort Fee Transparency

16 Oct 2019 10:05 AM
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Resort fees, which have been called “the most hated fee in travel,” have prompted lawsuits and a bill before Congress — the Hotel Advertising Transparency Act of 2019. Now the American Society of Travel Advisors is among advocates for the bill, which would prohibit hotels and other short-term rentals from advertising room rates that don’t disclose extra charges other than government-imposed taxes and fees.

While travelers may have grown accustomed to being hit with extra charges for services and amenities that used to be included — not only at hotels but on airlines and cruise ships as well — they at least deserve to know beforehand what the actual costs will be. Travel advisors often step in to counsel clients on hidden charges, but they shouldn’t have to.

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